Graduate

Graduate Student Instructor Training Seminar

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Instructor(s)
Units
2
Section
1
Number
375
CCN
22716
Times
Fri 9:30-11:30am
Location
SOCS749
Course Description

PS 375 is a two-credit course designed for first-time Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs).  The course seeks to introduce students to practical teaching methods and to foster discussion about effective pedagogy. It also focuses on professional development, in particular on developing skills that are closely related to effective teaching such as presentation skills. The course features student presentations on selected pedagogical topics, panels on key issues related to teaching and to professional development, and discussion of weekly assignments in relation to challenges encountered by GSIs in the course of their teaching.

Workshop in Law, Philosophy & Political Theory

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Units
4
Section
1
Number
211
CCN
22695
Times
Friday 12-3pm
Location
BLAW141
Course Description

This course is a workshop for discussing work-in-progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The central aim is to enable students to engage directly with legal scholars, philosophers, and political theorists working on important normative questions. Another aim is to bring together scholars from different disciplines and perspectives, such as economics, history, sociology, and political science, who have normative interests.

The theme for the Fall 2022 workshop is "Structural Injustice".

The format of the course is as follows: for the sessions with guest presenters, a designated student commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2:00 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest until 3:00.

This is a cross-listed/room-shared course with the Philosophy and Political Science Departments. Students may enroll through Law (Law 210.2), Philosophy (Philosophy 290-09), or Political Science (PS 211). The first class will be on Friday, August 26th - 12PM-3PM, and the final class meeting is November 18th .

This semester the workshop is co-taught by Veronique Munoz-Darde and Johann Frick.

 

August 26 - Introduction - no speaker
September 2 - Sally Haslanger, MIT
September 9 - Kate Manne, Cornell
September 16 - Alex Voorhoeve, LSE
September 23 - Renée Jorgensen, Michigan
September 30 - tbc
October 7 - Lucas Stanczyk, Harvard
October 14 - tbc
October 21 - Wendy Salkin, Stanford
October 28 - David Estlund, Brown
November 4 - Khiara Bridges, Berkeley
November 18 - Debra Satz, Stanford

 

 

Requirements

Attendance at the first class is required.

Research and Writing

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Units
4
Section
1
Number
290A
CCN
19366
Times
Thurs 9am-11am
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

The goal of this yearlong course is to provide a forum in which students propose, develop, and complete a research project that produces a journal-length paper of publishable quality. This paper will typically serve as students' second-year M.A. essay, and the course is intended as a complement to that requirement. This course is primarily oriented towards second-year Ph.D. students in any subfield (students in other years may participate with the professors’ consent). The course meets regularly during parts of the fall semester and irregularly during the spring semester. In the first few weeks of the course, we discuss the process of moving from research topic to research question; and we survey published articles by recent Ph.D. students/assistant professors, focusing on the structure and nature of the writing and presentation as well the quality of the argument and evidence. We then move to students’ research proposals for the rest of the fall semester. During the spring semester, students meet individually with the course instructors and their advisors, develop and revise drafts of their papers, and present their work at a department “APSA-style” conference. In order to complete the course and receive credit, students must complete the requirements for both semesters.

Emerging Research in International Relations and Comparative Politics - IR/CP Workshop

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Section
1
Number
290IC
CCN
26265
Times
Tues 11am-12pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

The main aims of this workshop are met through a forum in which faculty and graduate students at various career stages work closely together. It is an applied workshop with an emphasis on learning by doing and on learning how to be a more constructive colleague. Rather than segregate PhD students by cohort, the workshop is designed to bring cohorts together in order to facilitate the student-to-student transfer of skills and knowledge.

American Political Development

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
274
CCN
32620
Times
Th 2-4
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

This course examines the growth and development of American political institutions over time. We will be concerned with analyzing, explaining, and understanding key transformative sequences in American politics, tracing the implications of these transformations for later American politics, and considering alternative possible paths of development. Key questions include: in what sense has the American political system “developed”? What is the role of America’s liberal political culture in shaping American political institutions? What is the relationship between changes in the economy and changes in state and party organization?

 

Note: This description is from Spring 2012.

American Government & Politics Field Seminar

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
271
CCN
24829
Times
F 11:30am-1:30pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

This seminar is designed to acquaint students with current research approaches in various subfields of American Politics. Particular attention will be given to debates over theory, methodology, and substance. The seminar is not designed to provide a complete survey of the field. Students planning to be examined in American Politics are expected to master recommended readings on their own and should review additional readings included in versions of this seminar offered in the past years.

SELECTED TOPICS IN POLITICAL BEHAVIOR: EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

Level
Semester
Fall 2022
Units
4
Section
1
Number
269
CCN
23992
Times
Mon 12-2pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

The course will provide students with: (1) a methodological foundation to help them craft and evaluate experimental studies; (2) opportunities to read and discuss political science research using experimental methods; and (3) a structured setting in which to develop their research ideas, with feedback from peers and the instructor.