Graduate

Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Identity and Identification

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
210
CCN
27020
Times
Fridays 12-3pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

Why do political cleavages often divide along lines of race and ethnicity? Does human psychology tend towards ‘groupism’? How do government institutions like schools, police and elections increase or decrease the salience of various ethnic and religious boundaries? This course investigates the relationship between identity, groups and politics in the U.S. and around the world. We will consider theories of group identity development; assess empirical approaches to the study of racial and ethnic groups in politics; evaluate intersections of salient identities and look at how politically relevant aspects of identity can be measured for conducting original research.

 

Special Topics in Political Theory: Rights

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
211
CCN
23022
Times
Monday 12-2pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

This course covers the history and theory of rights in recent scholarship in political theory and jurisprudence. The course is divided into two main parts. The first offers a history of rights in the West and explores some of the major textual sources of a modern ‘science of right.’ Among the major sources to be studied will be Roman private law (especially the crucial distinction between rights in rem and rights in personam), medieval canon law, the theory of natural rights, and major early modern sources on rights: Suarez, Grotius, Pufendorf, Hobbes, Locke, Bentham, and Kant. The seminar will also read major recent studies of this history, including Brett, Feenstra, Tierney, Tuck, Villey. The second part of the course proceeds to consider the major conceptual, normative, and interpretive problems on the status of rights in contemporary jurisprudence and political theory: Major problems for study in seminar may include the correlativity of rights and duties; the
‘Will Theory’ vs. ‘Interest Theory’ debate; the status of collective or group rights; the status of human rights; the function of rights in liberal political theory and constitutional democracy; the role of the state in a rights regime. Readings may include texts by Dworkin, Feinberg, Gilbert, Hart, Hohfeld, Kelsen, Nozick, Raz, Rawls, Sreenivasan, Waldron, and Wenar.

 

Workshop in Law, Philosophy & Political Theory

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Units
4
Section
2
Number
211
CCN
25906
Times
Friday 12-3pm
Location
BLAW141
Course Description

This course is a workshop for discussing works in progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The workshop creates a space for students to engage directly with philosophers, political theorists, and legal scholars working on normative questions toward the goal of fostering critical thinking about concepts of value and developing analytical thinking and writing skills. Another aim is to bring together people from different disciplines and perspectives who have strong normative interests or who speak to issues philosophers and theorists should know something about.

For Spring 2023, the workshop will focus on the intersection of religion with law, politics, and philosophy. The schedule of guest speakers will be posted as the semester approaches.

The format of the course is as follows. A designated student commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to all, including non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2:00pm and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest from 2:10 to 3:00pm.

This is a shared seating course between the Law School (Law 210.2B), the Philosophy Department (Philosophy 290-6), and the Political Science Department (PS 211).

The Instructors for the Spring 2023 semester are: Jonathan Gould and Joshua Cohen

 

This course will follow Law's Academic Calendar meeting Fridays January 13th-April 21st (14 weeks).  Please contact psgradadvise@berkeley.edu if interested in this course.

 

Requirements

Attendance at the first class is required.

History of Political Economy

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
3
Number
211
CCN
33142
Times
M 9:30am-12:10pm
Location
40PD102
Course Description

This course will consider the history of political economy as a history of economic and political discourses from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, paying particular attention to intersections with the history of legal thought. The focus will be on three themes: first, the transformation of the ancient theoretical vocabulary of polis and oikos into the modern vocabulary of civil society (or economy) and state; second, the emergence of the concept of the self-equilibrating economy in the eighteenth century, and subsequent controversies over its normative underpinnings; third, the rise and fall of classical political economy and its relation to its successor schools, nineteenth-century marginalism and twenty-century welfare economics. Readings will consist mainly of primary works by central figures in this historical tradition.

 

 

This course will follow Law's Academic Calendar meeting Mondays January 9th-April 24th  (14 weeks).  Please contact david.grewal@berkeley.edu if interested in this course.

Research Workshop in Quantitative Modeling

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Section
1
Number
291F
CCN
23027
Times
Thurs 3-5pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in quantitativemodeling. Anyone working on quantitative modeling or empirical testing of quantitative models is welcome to attend. To receive credit for the course, a student must attend regularly, participate actively, and make at least two presentations per semester. Presentations can be of the student's own work-in-progress or of work by other scholars (including both influential/classic works or interesting current working papers).

Variable Unit Course: 1.0 to 3.0

Symposium in Contemporary Political Theory: Representation

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
216
CCN
33003
Times
Friday 3-6pm
Location
SOCS749
Course Description

An intensive examination of a contemporary theorist, debate, or issue.

 

The course is primarily aimed at graduate students preparing for the Political Theory comprehensive exam, but qualified, advanced undergraduates majoring in Political Science, Classics, Philosophy or related fields are also very welcome to enroll with permission of the instructor. Please apply by email to daniela.cammack@berkeley.edu. Attach your transcript and a writing sample and be prepared for a 15-minute zoom interview. Auditors are also very welcome, although in order to secure a large enough classroom, I’d appreciate it if those who can enroll Sat/Unsat could do so.

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN THEORY

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
291T
CCN
25775
Times
Mon 2-4pm
Location
SOCS749
Course Description

This course is a  seminar which can be taken for 0 - 2 units, Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory with the following course description:

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress by graduate students. To receive credit for the course, the student will participate fully, including, as asked, either making a presentation of work in progress or serving as lead  discussant for another student's work. Appropriate works-in-progress include  (but are not limited to) a paper in preparation for submission to a journal, a dissertation prospectus (including early drafts), a dissertation chapter, or a job market paper. Anyone working on theory is welcome.

COMPARATIVE POLITICS COLLOQUIUM

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
2
Section
1
Number
291AS
CCN
23026
Times
Thurs 12-2pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

This colloquium exposes graduate students and faculty to work by leading scholars of comparative politics working in diverse substantive areas. Graduate students are expected to read circulated papers of visiting speakers ahead of the colloquium and participate actively in raising questions and making comments.  They are encouraged to meet visiting speakers in their areas of interest in group or one-on-one sessions. 

NOTE: This description is from Spring 2015

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN AMERICAN POLITICS

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
291
CCN
19742
Times
W 12-1:30pm
Location
MOSES119
Course Description

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress by graduate students. To receive two units of credit, a student must make at least one presentation of work in progress and serve as a discussant for another student's presentation. To receive one unit of credit a student must regularly attend class and participate in discussion, but will not be required to make a presentation. Appropriate works in progress include (but are not limited to) a paper in preparation for submission to a journal, a dissertation prospectus (including early drafts), a dissertation chapter, or a job market paper. Anyone working on American politics, political behavior, public law, or public administration is welcome.