Graduate

COMPARATIVE POLITICS COLLOQUIUM

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
2
Section
1
Number
291AS
CCN
23026
Times
Thurs 12-2pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

This colloquium exposes graduate students and faculty to work by leading scholars of comparative politics working in diverse substantive areas. Graduate students are expected to read circulated papers of visiting speakers ahead of the colloquium and participate actively in raising questions and making comments.  They are encouraged to meet visiting speakers in their areas of interest in group or one-on-one sessions. 

NOTE: This description is from Spring 2015

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN AMERICAN POLITICS

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
291
CCN
19742
Times
W 12-1:30pm
Location
MOSES119
Course Description

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress by graduate students. To receive two units of credit, a student must make at least one presentation of work in progress and serve as a discussant for another student's presentation. To receive one unit of credit a student must regularly attend class and participate in discussion, but will not be required to make a presentation. Appropriate works in progress include (but are not limited to) a paper in preparation for submission to a journal, a dissertation prospectus (including early drafts), a dissertation chapter, or a job market paper. Anyone working on American politics, political behavior, public law, or public administration is welcome.

Emerging Research in International Relations and Comparative Politics - IR/CP Workshop

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Section
1
Number
290IC
CCN
25826
Times
Tues 1-2pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

The main aims of this workshop are met through a forum in which faculty and graduate students at various career stages work closely together. It is an applied workshop with an emphasis on learning by doing and on learning how to be a more constructive colleague. Rather than segregate PhD students by cohort, the workshop is designed to bring cohorts together in order to facilitate the student-to-student transfer of skills and knowledge.

Research and Writing

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Units
4
Section
1
Number
290B
CCN
19744
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

The goal of this yearlong course is to provide a forum in which students propose, develop, and complete a research project that produces a journal-length paper of publishable quality. This paper will typically serve as students' second-year M.A. essay, and the course is intended as a complement to that requirement. This course is primarily oriented towards second-year Ph.D. students in any subfield (students in other years may participate with the professors’ consent). The course meets regularly during parts of the fall semester and irregularly during the spring semester. In the first few weeks of the course, we discuss the process of moving from research topic to research question; and we survey published articles by recent Ph.D. students/assistant professors, focusing on the structure and nature of the writing and presentation as well the quality of the argument and evidence. We then move to students’ research proposals for the rest of the fall semester. During the spring semester, students meet individually with the course instructors and their advisors, develop and revise drafts of their papers, and present their work at a department “APSA-style” conference. In order to complete the course and receive credit, students must complete the requirements for both semesters.

Political Behavior

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
261
CCN
33006
Times
Mon 3-5pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

A comprehensive review of the major topics in political behavior through intensive examination of the theories, findings, and proceedings of the most significant studies in the field.

Ethnic Politics

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
246B
CCN
33005
Times
Wed 4-6pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

This graduate seminar is designed to introduce students to the comparative study of ethnic politics. It provides an overview of theoretical frameworks and methodological innovations across topics such as group mobilization, cleavage activation, identity representation, redistributive politics, and political violence. The readings are drawn from various political science subfields as well as other disciplines, reflecting a range of regional and country contexts. The purpose of the course is to provide graduate students with the background necessary for undertaking original research on questions relating to various forms of identity politics.

QUANTITATIVE METHODOLOGY IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES SEMINAR - From Sample to Population: Design and Analysis of Surveys and Experiments for Generalizable Inference

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
236B
CCN
25810
Times
Tues 9am-12pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

Social scientists often rely on nonrandom samples, whether due to nonresponse, convenience sampling, or practical design considerations, when studying descriptive or causal relationships.  This class focuses on design and analysis techniques that allow researchers to draw generalizable inferences from non representative data.  In particular, we will study sampling and randomization design; weighting and modeling methods; and sensitivity analyses with applications to survey analysis and external validity of experiments.

 

 

Discussion sections held Wednesdays 2-4pm in SOCS791.

Prerequisites

Political Science 231A and 231B or equivalent. Experience with R is assumed.

Qualitative and Multi-Method Research

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
234A
CCN
24518
Times
Tues 2-4pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

This graduate seminar introduces students to the rapidly evolving field of qualitative and multimethod research. The seminar is designed to provide students with an overview of qualitative methods essential to political science research. In addition, we will consider a range of ways in which qualitative methods can be integrated with each other, as well as other research methodologies, such as field and natural experiments, formal models, and statistical modeling. Required readings cover classic texts, recent innovations, and applied examples.

Note that this means there is a lot of reading! Students are expected to become familiar with both the methodological ideas and their substantive application.

 

The overriding goal of the course is to provide students with the background necessary to use qualitative and multimethod techniques in their own original research. It will enable students to master core tools, understand basic problems, and explore advanced topics. Students should ultimately be able to apply these methods in writing a dissertation prospectus, grant proposal, or research paper.

Formal Models of Political Science

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
232A
CCN
23023
Times
Wed 9am-12pm
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the methodology of game theory and related modeling techniques, with a focus on applications in the study of politics.  The goal of the course is to get students familiar with the basic tools and frameworks of formal models as used in political science research.  This will enable you to be a more-informed reader of the growing body of literature that uses these methods or that tests predictions derived with them.  It should also prove useful in structuring your thinking about political actors and outcomes even when you are not explicitly using a formal model.  This course will also provide a starting point for students who hope to pursue more advanced training and even to use formal theory in their own future research.

 

 

Discussion sections held Thursdays 5-6:30pm.

Prerequisites

PS230 or other equivalent coursework covering multivariate calculus, probability theory, and optimization (e.g. Math 53 and Stat 20).

Quantitative Analysis in Political Research: Design and Causal Inference

Level
Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
231B
CCN
24517
Times
Mon 9am-12pm
Location
SOCS202
Course Description

This course introduces techniques for drawing causal inferences from quantitative data in the social sciences. We discuss the role of strong research design and compare and contrast design- and model-based strategies. The course introduces instrumental variables, regression-discontinuity designs, difference-in-differences, and path models and mediation analysis, and it extends analysis of topics introduced in 231a, including regression diagnostics. We consider the value of multi-method research, as well as concerns about data mining and multiple hypothesis testing. The course makes central use of bootstrap simulations and programming in R, using data from published studies. The interpretation and validation of modeling assumptions constitutes a central focus.

 

 

Discussion sections held Fridays 9:30-11:30am in SOCS791.

Prerequisites

POL SCI 231A or equivalent.