Session D

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS

Level
Semester
Summer 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
1
CCN
14310
Times
MTWR 4-6m
Location
CORY277
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the U.S. political system from the nation's founding to the present. In addition to examining the core structures of our federal system, we will also explore a number of special topics, such as the evolution of civil rights and the causes of partisan gridlock. The course will pay particular attention to the role institutions play in shaping political conflict and, ultimately in determining who wins and who loses.

 

 

 

Special Topics in Area Studies: State and Democracy in Russia

Level
Semester
Summer 2023
Units
4
Section
1
Number
149
CCN
15658
Times
MTWR 8-10am
Location
NGAT105
Course Description

The development of state and democracy in Russia is key to understanding how modern states are made and the enduring push and pull between democracy and autocracy. The ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine reflects the contradictions between Russia’s quest for state-building and internal limitations on democratic participation and representation. Where do these contradictions come from and how has Russia historically navigated the twin pressures to be a strong state and respect political liberties? This upper-level course in political science looks at three periods – the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet Putin’s Russia – to compare and contrast the trajectory of reform of Russian political institutions and thus understand the internal political dynamics shaping Russian politics and history – important lessons for students of comparative politics and policy makers today.

 

Instructor: Otto Kienitz

 

This course number will change to be 149K before the first day of class.

HISTORY OF POLITICAL THEORY: EARLY MODERN TO FRENCH REVOLUTION

Level
Semester
Summer 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
112B
CCN
14407
Times
MTWR 10-12
Course Description

The aim of this course is to introduce students to key texts and topics by some of the most significant and well known thinkers in the history early modern political thought writing roughly between 1500 and 1770. The works we will consider span the periods characterized by European historians as the Renaissance, the Reformation and the Enlightenment.

 

Please note that this course description is from Spring 2014.

INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Level
Semester
Summer 2022
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
5
CCN
15557
Times
MTWR 12-2pm
Location
INTR
Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theoretical approaches to international politics, to explore important historical and contemporary questions and debates in international affairs, and to teach students to think critically about international relations.  After defining what the study of international relations involves and discussing the how and why of thinking theoretically, we will discuss the major theoretical approaches, concepts, and debates in the field. We will then turn to security issues looking at both World Wars and the Cold War.  The next section of the course looks at issues of political economy including questions of development, rich-poor country relations, and globalization.  Finally we examine a number of contemporary issues of global governance including human rights, ethnic conflict, humanitarian intervention, and environmental issues. We end the semester looking at shifting power dynamics internationally including the rise of China.

Summer 2022 Synchronous Lecture and Discussions will be offered ONLINE only.

 

All readings for this class will be provided electronically, at no cost, through the library. If you prefer, you can purchase the two main books electronically or in paper form. If you choose to purchase, be sure to get the correct edition listed below.

Art and Jervis, eds. International Politics, 13th edition: https://www.amazon.com/International-Politics-Enduring-Concepts-Contemporary/dp/0134482018/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3H57SMJMF7BAT&keywords=art+and+jervis&qid=1648655544&sprefix=art+and+jervis%2Caps%2C124&sr=8-1

Mingst, et al, Essentials of International Relations, 9th edition: https://www.amazon.com/Essentials-International-Relations-Karen-Mingst/dp/0393872181/ref=sr_1_3?crid=O6S1FVSBGRX9&keywords=mingst+essentials+of+international+relations+9th&qid=1648655734&sprefix=mingst%2Caps%2C123&sr=8-3

 

 

Special Topics in Political Theory: Sovereignty

Level
Semester
Summer 2022
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
116O
CCN
14220
Times
MTWR 10am-12pm
Location
HFAXA1
Course Description

This course aims to study sovereignty, widely regarded the core concept constitutive of modern state-centric politics and international law.  The first part of the course will study the origins of the concept in medieval legal and political thought and its later development in major texts by Bodin, Grotius, Hobbes, Pufendorf, Rousseau, Schmitt, Arendt.  The second part of the course will then focus on major interpretive themes associated with the politics of sovereignty, such as territoriality, constitutionalism, and sovereignty in international law.  Readings may include studies by Agamben, Grimm, Kantorowicz, Krasner, Kalyvas, Loughlin, Skinner, Stilz, and Tierney.  This is an upper-level undergraduate Theory course.  It is highly recommended that students will have already completed EITHER PS 112a or 112b or an equivalent course in the history of political thought.  

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS

Level
Semester
Summer 2022
Units
4
Section
1
Number
1
CCN
14116
Times
MTWR 8-10am
Location
BIRG50
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the U.S. political system from the nation's founding to the present. In addition to examining the core structures of our federal system, we will also explore a number of special topics, such as the evolution of civil rights and the causes of partisan gridlock. The course will pay particular attention to the role institutions play in shaping political conflict and, ultimately,in determining who wins and who loses.

Instructor: Thomas Kent