Undergraduate

CALIFORNIA POLITICS

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
171
CCN
23010
Times
MW 12-2pm
Location
LEWS9
Course Description

This course provides an overview of California politics, with a focus on contemporary issues and an analysis of who wields power and why. Specifically, the course will focus on : the demographic, social and economic forces that shape the State's politics- the three official branches of state government (executive, legislative and judicial)- the three unofficial branches (the media, lobbyists and interest groups)- campaigns (candidates, initiatives, consultants, pollsters, political parties and money), local government, the state budget and education policies.

Subfield:   American Politics

Please note this description is from Fall 2013

 

Introduction to Political Theory

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
4
CCN
22971
Times
TuTh 8-9:30am
Location
DWIN155
Course Description

Political theory is about ideas, including freedom, equality, and justice.  Political ideas matter because we act on them; they inform our institutions of governance.  They matter too because we debate our future using them; they tell us what is to be done.  By the end of this course, you should have a better grasp of the ideas that inspired the world in which we live and the ideas that might direct our future. To be effective, political theories have to contain ideas that support one another in wider webs.  Ideologies are examples of webs of political ideas, containing ideas about what the world is like, why it is as it is, and what it might become.  After a brief examination of the nature of political theory and ideology, we will study the main ideologies found in contemporary political debate: liberalism, conservatism, socialism, nationalism, feminism and environmentalism.

Introduction to Comparative Politics

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
2
CCN
22958
Times
Tu/Th 9:30-11am
Location
STAN105
Course Description

This course will introduce students to some key concepts used in contemporary comparative political analysis. It will do so through an examination of the reasons for why some modern nation states provide better living conditions for their citizens. Are these differences due to factors such as political institutions, legislative arrangements, parties and party systems, or social forces such as culture and ethnicity? Class lectures will focus on developing an understanding of how political scientists use these terms and whether they provide adequate explanations for why states vary so substantially in their performance. There will be two lectures per week and one required discussion section.

This description is from Fall 2012.

INTRODUCTION TO EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS AND QUANTITATIVE METHODS

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
3
CCN
26709
Times
MW 5-6:30pm
Location
VLSB2050
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the methods employed in empirical political science research. We will cover basic topics in research design, statistics, and formal modeling, considering many examples along the way. The two primary goals of the course are: (1) to provide students with analytic tools that will help them to understand how political scientists do empirical research, and (2) to improve students' ability to pose and answer research questions on their own. There are no prerequisites.

 

Note: Course description is from Fall 2013

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
1
CCN
22946
Times
Tu/Th 11-12:30pm
Location
VLSB2050
Course Description

This class is an introduction to the American political system. The course is designed to make you think about the logic of our government's institutions, and the consequences - both intended and unintended - of these institutions for the political behavior of citizens, legislators, and other political leaders and activists. Topics to be covered include the Constitution, American political culture, civil rights, the presidency, Congress, Supreme Court, political parties, elections, public opinion, and interest groups.

Please note the description is from Spring 2014

 

COLLOQUIUM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
179
CCN
23669
Times
W 4-5
Location
WHLR150
Course Description

This one-unit course will feature a guest speaker each week discussing an issue currently in the news. The class is open to all students, and there are no prerequisites. The class is offered Pass/Not Pass, based on a final examination. May be repeated for credit.

This course does not count as an upper division Political Science requirement.

Requirements

The Apperson Product Form # 2833 which will be used for the final examination will be available for purchase at ASUC bookstore.

Public Opinion, Voting and Participation

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
161
CCN
24405
Times
Tu/Th 5-6:30PM
Location
HMMB390
Course Description

This course examines public opinion in American Politics and how to measure it. The course considers the nature of public opinion, survey methods, the role of polling in opinion expression, opinion formation, citizen knowledge, the role of media in shaping opinion, the effect of opinion on policy, and political polarization.

 

Instructor: Stephanie Nail

Subfield: American Politics

THE POLITICS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA: CRISIS, CONFLICT AND REFORM

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
149E
CCN
23006
Times
MW 4:00-6:00
Location
DWIN145
Course Description

This course will focus on the transformative process through which the nations of contemporary Southeast Asia have confronted political crises and instability and the various levels of success with which they have attempted to implement comprehensive programs of reform.  This course will analyze several different areas of political activity, such as:  state-led initiatives (political economy) regarding development and resource distribution; citizen and opposition movements both within and outside formal state institutions which seek to influence, alter, or overturn state action and policy; institution-building and the cultivation of social capital; and regional and transnational flows of capital and labor which act in alliance with or in opposition to national economic institutions.  Specific topics will include a comparative analysis of state policy; the relationship between illicit economies (such as narcotics) and ethnic insurgency; the nascent political voice of religion and ethnicity as nationalist or opposition ideologies; the expansion and influence of local NGOs (legal aid, human rights, women’s rights, etc.); political violence and alternative paths to the expression of discontent; and corruption.  After a general overview of Southeast Asia as a regional political theater, we will turn our attention to a series of in-depth case studies.  

Please note that this course description is from Spring 2015

Subfield: Comparative Politics

Projecting Power

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
140O
CCN
32657
Times
Tu/Th 5-6:30PM
Location
CORY247
Course Description

The course will cover ethnic politics, broadly conceived with a particular focus on social movements, protests, civil disobedience and political violence. Related topics may include immigration, crime and the state, and urban politics. We will consider a range of questions including, how do stories influence our sense of self, community and nation? How do filmmaking techniques influence which people and issues become salient? How do aesthetic and narrative choices affect attitudes about the social order and who is deserving of power? Through close readings of films, social science, and media studies scholarship, this course will enable students to study key political science concepts, the institution of cinema, and how stories make meaning

 

Subfield:   Comparative Politics

Special Topics in American Politics: The Executive Branch and its Political Environment

Semester
Spring 2023
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
109E
CCN
33463
Times
Tu/Th 12:30-2pm
Location
LEWS9
Course Description

This course analyzes the US executive branch from an institutional perspective. Topics covered include the presidency and bureaucracy, their interaction in the policy making process, and their political engagement with other branches of government. Assessments will include short papers, an exam, a final project, and class engagement. 

Subfield: American Politics

 

This course number was change 10/26/22. It was originally listed as PS109E.