Search
Search

Fall 2017

semester status
Active

Research Workshop in Quatitative Modeling

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Number
291F
CCN
22413
Times
F 1:30-3:30
Location
119 Moses
Course Description

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in quantitativemodeling. Anyone working on quantitative modeling or empiricaltesting of quantitative models is welcome to attend. To receive creditfor the course, a student must attend regularly, participate actively,and make at least two presentations per semester. Presentations canbe of the student's own work-in-progress or of work by other scholars (including both influential/classic works or interesting current working papers).

Variable Unit Course: 1.0 to 3.0

JUNIOR SEMINAR: Democratic Erosion

Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
4
Number
191
CCN
33470
Times
M 1-3pm
Location
749 Barrows
Course Description

Democracies can break down---but they fail in different ways at different times for different reasons.  In this course, we will explore the causes and consequences of democratic erosion in comparative and historical perspective. We survey theoretical literatures on populism, fascism, hybrid authoritarian regimes, and military coups; and we consider the dynamics of polarization and identity politics; electoral violence; and civil resistance. We glean lessons from failures of democracy in inter-war Europe, Venezuela, Russia, and other cases, and we consider the possibility of democratic erosion in contemporary Europe and the United States. Finally, we analyze strategies for confronting democratic erosion when it occurs. Readings will address both empirical and normative questions and will combine academic writing with other kinds of sources. Students will write a research paper related to the topic of the course. Enrollment in this junior seminar is capped.

 

 

 

Requirements

The Junior Seminars are intense writing seminars which focus on the research area of the faculty member teaching the course.   The seminars provide an opportunity for students to have direct intellectual interactions with faculty members while also giving the students an understanding for faculty research.

This junior seminar falls within the "Comparative" subfield, and can fulfill an upper-division requirement for the major.

 

Prerequisites

Political Science Majors of Junior and Senior status (must be 3rd or 4th year students with at least 60 units completed) with a minimum overall UC GPA of 3.3.  Students must place themselves on the waitlist through TeleBEARS in Phase II. Priority may be given to students who have not yet taken a junior seminar.  Selection and notification will occur early August 2017.

Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Philosophy of Social Science

Level
Semester
Units
4
Section
2
Number
210
CCN
22539
Times
W 10:00-12:00
Location
202 Barrows
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the philosophical underpinnings of contemporary political (and more generally social) science. Our goal is to reflect on the epistemological and ontological biases inherent in methodological approaches such as rational choice, interpretivism, behavioralism, institutionalism, and post-modernism. For example, what counts as knowledge in each approach, and how is such knowledge ascertained? To what extent does each consider social reality "out there" to be discovered rather than "in here" (our heads)-- constructed by us? Are there universal criteria by which one can compare the usefulness or validity of different approaches? Should there be? We will begin by reviewing some of the dualisms that currently preoccupy Western philosophy: naturalism/anti-naturalism, realism/constructivism, and objectivity/relativism. We then examine our methodological approaches in light of these conceptions of knowledge.

Research and Writing

Level
Semester
Units
4
Number
290A
CCN
19863
Times
M 10-12
Location
749 Barrows
Course Description

The goal of this yearlong course is to provide a forum in which students propose, develop, and complete a research project that produces a journal-length paper of publishable quality. This paper will typically serve as students' second-year M.A. essay, and the course is intended as a complement to that requirement. This course is primarily oriented towards second-year Ph.D. students in any subfield (students in other years may participate with the professors’ consent). The course meets regularly during parts of the fall semester and irregularly during the spring semester. In the first few weeks of the course, we discuss the process of moving from research topic to research question; and we survey published articles by recent Ph.D. students/assistant professors, focusing on the structure and nature of the writing and presentation as well the quality of the argument and evidence. We then move to students’ research proposals for the rest of the fall semester. During the spring semester, students meet individually with the course instructors and their advisors, develop and revise drafts of their papers, and present their work at a department “APSA-style” conference. In order to complete the course and receive credit, students must complete the requirements for both semesters.

THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
0
Number
220A
CCN
46416
Times
Tu 2-4
Location
202 Barrows
Course Description

This course is a graduate field seminar in International Politics.  We will survey and assess foundational theoretical perspectives, issues, and research programs in IR, placing each in historical perspective.  What kinds of questions does modern IR theory ask (and not ask) and about what kinds of problems?  What methods are used to seek answers?  What is the value of the answers?  Who uses them and for what?  Where is this field headed and where do we think it should be headed?  Through intensive reading and discussion as well as some small writing assignments, we will build a foundation for more advanced courses in International Relations as well as research agendas that can elaborate, refine, and extend contemporary debates in academic IR.  

 

Please note that this description is from Spring 2014.

 

Political Theory Workshop

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Number
211
CCN
19790
Times
F 12-3:15
Location
141 Boalt
Course Description

This course is a workshop for discussing work-in-progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The central aim is to enable students to engage directly with philosophers, political theorists, and legal scholars working on normative questions. Another aim is to create a space that brings together people from different disciplines and perspectives — including economists, sociologists, and political scientists as well as journalists — who have strong normative interests or who speak to issues philosophers and theorists should know something about. In Fall 2017, the workshop will focus on “borders, citizenship, and immigration.” A list of confirmed presenters is below.

           

The format of the course will be as follows. For the sessions with guest presenters, lunch will be served starting at 12:00. We’ll begin at 12:15. A designated commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the presenter’s paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students and faculty who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 1:45 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest presenter from 2:00 to 3:00.

This is a room-shared course. Students may enroll through the Law School (Law 210.2), Philosophy Department (Philosophy 290), or the Political Science Department (PS 211). The first class will meet on Friday, August 25. (Course follows Law School Calendar -- https://www.law.berkeley.edu/php-programs/courses/academic_calendars.php?termYear=2017)

 
Co-taught by Joshua Cohen and Professor Sarah Song
 
The course is cross-listed with the Philosophy Department and the Law School.

Schedule:

8/25        Intro meeting (for enrolled students only)

 

9/1          Michael Clemens, Center for Global Development

9/8          Joseph Carens, University of Toronto Political Science 

9/15        Annie Stilz, Princeton Politics

9/22        Kamal Sadiq, U.C. Irvine Political Science 

9/29        Irene Bloemraad, U.C. Berkeley Sociology

 

10/6        Sungmoon Kim, University of Hong Kong Political Science

10/13      Katerina Linos, U.C. Berkeley Law

10/20      Rogers Smith, University of Pennsylvania Political Science 

10/27      David Martin, University of Virginia Law

 

11/3        Cristina Rodriguez, Yale Law

11/10      Veterans Day – No class

11/17      Leti Volpp, U.C. Berkeley Law 

11/24      Thanksgiving recess – No class

 

12/1        Reihan Salam, Executive Editor of National Review

 

JUNIOR SEMINAR: Fragile States

Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
6
Number
191
CCN
33525
Times
M 3-5
Location
791 Barrows
Course Description

This course focuses on understanding the causes and consequences of state fragility in different parts of the world. Students who enroll in the course will examine a variety of policy options for helping fragile or failing states to build state capacity in areas such as security and public services. The course will afford students a unique opportunity to participate in international collaboration. The course will be prepared by faculty from University of California, Berkeley, Cambridge University, National University of Singapore, and University of Tokyo. The four universities will collaborate in sharing a core syllabus, common course materials, and lectures across campuses. Students will also have the opportunity to work with colleagues from the other universities across the globe on group projects that lead to policy recommendations.

Requirements

Minimum GPA: 3.3

The Junior Seminars are intense writing seminars which focus on the research area of the faculty member teaching the course. The seminars will provide an opportunity for students to have direct intellectual interactions with faculty members while also giving the students an understanding for faculty research.

Junior seminars fulfill upper division requirements for the major.

Subfield:   Comparative

Prerequisites

Political Science Majors of Junior and Senior status, with a minimum overall UC GPA of 3.3. Students must place themselves on the waitlist through "CalCentral" in Phase II. Selection and notification will occur in mid-August.   Priority may be given to students who have not yet taken a junior seminar.