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Junior Seminar: Global Trade

Semester
Instructor(s)
Section
2
Number
191
CCN
17244
Times
Mon 10am-12pm
Location
EVAN51
Course Description

How does foreign policy shape the global economy? What explains the creation of international
institutions to facilitate global economic governance? How might these governance frameworks
change in the 21 st century? This course introduces theories and issues in the international
political economy of trade. In light of the challenges posed to the existing liberal order, China’s
rise, and the rise of anti-globalization, trade policy is becoming an increasingly central foreign
policy concern—with consequences for both national and international security. To address this
rapidly shifting context, this seminar provides a foundational understanding of international
trade, the character of multilateral and minilateral negotiations, and economic dimensions of
statecraft. Following an overview of leading theories in international political economy, the
course focuses on the domestic origins of trade policy focusing on NGOs, business interests,
and government agencies. In particular, we will examine industrial policy with an eye to its impact on global trade policy. We then turn to the origin and evolution of the World Trade Organization, the rise of mega-free trade agreements, bilateral trade negotiations, and
unilateral protectionism—reflecting on both historical and contemporary cases. Alongside seminar participation, students will write a paper of approximate 4,000 words that explores one or more trade arrangements. 

Prerequisites

Any college-level (Berkeley or another four-year university or community college) course in economics is a prerequisite.