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Fall 2021

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Semester dates
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Selected Topics in Methodology: Design-Based Inference

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Section
2
Number
239
CCN
33108
Times
M/Th 8:30-10am
Location
SOCS791
Course Description

This course covers design and design-based inference for both surveys and randomized
experiments. In covering the two domains, the course emphasizes the important and
underappreciated relationship between design and analysis. The lectures go back and
forth between discussing tools for surveys and experiments to highlight connections.
Problem sets will emphasize both application and theory. A final project will require
students to apply methods learned in this class to design a study or evaluate an analytic
method.

Prerequisites

Required skills. Students should have completed PS231A with an A. Students with less
technical background will find the course pushes their capabilities. The course will be
limited to PhD students. PhD students from other departments may take the course as
long as they meet the requirements.

Citizenship and Immigration

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
3
Number
211
CCN
32130
Times
Wed 10am-12:40pm
Location
40PD102
Course Description

In this course we will explore questions about citizenship and immigration in the contemporary world. Readings will be drawn from scholarship in political theory, law, and the social sciences with the goal of integrating insights from these different fields in new, thought-provoking ways. 

The first half of the course will focus on citizenship. How should we conceive of citizenship? As a formal legal status, an entitlement to a set of rights, active participation in self-governance, an identity, or something else? What is the relationship between citizenship, on the one hand, and race, class, gender, sexuality, and national origin, on the other? Which rights have historically been attached to citizenship status and which rights have been extended to noncitizens? What would cosmopolitan citizenship look like?

The second half of the course will focus on immigration. Why do people migrate across international borders? Should people be allowed to migrate across borders? States exert control over migration but what, if anything, justifies this control? What is the impact of migration on sending countries, receiving countries, and migrants themselves? What are the key dynamics in the politics of immigration and how do they constrain immigration policymaking? What are the current immigration categories and priorities in U.S. immigration law? What kinds of immigration policies should the U.S. and other liberal democratic countries pursue? 

 

The course is cross-listed with the Law School. Restricted to Graduate student enrollment only.

Requirements

Careful reading of texts, thoughtful participation in seminar discussions, and 5 papers approximately 1000 words each.

ETHICS AND JUSTICE IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
124C
CCN
25005
Times
TuTh 12:30-2pm
Location
BIRG50
Course Description

Should nations intervene in other countries to prevent human rights abuses or famine? On what principles should immigration be based? Should wealthy states aid poorer states, and if so, how much? Is it ever right to go to war? And if so, when, and with what means? We will examine different traditions in moral thought and use these tools to make reasoned judgments about these and similar difficult moral problems such as these in world politics.

This course falls within the International Relations subfield.

Please note the description is from Spring 2013

Foundations of Moral Philosophy

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
2
Number
211
CCN
25357
Times
Tuesday 10am-12:40pm
Location
40PD102
Course Description

This seminar offers an overview of the history of moral philosophy, paying special attention to arguments about the relationship of morality to law, as well as the connections between moral philosophy and political economy. We will begin by studying canonical texts before turning to more contemporary work. Authors will include Aristotle, Cicero, Pufendorf, Hume, Smith, Bentham, Kant, Mill, Edgeworth, Pareto, Sen, Williams, Anderson, Rorty, and others.

 

 

The course begins August 17th and is combined with Law.

 

American Government Field Seminar

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
271
CCN
26044
Times
Tuesday 10am-12pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This seminar is designed to acquaint students with current research approaches in various subfields of American Politics. Particular attention will be given to debates over theory, methodology, and substance. The seminar is not designed to provide a complete survey of the field. Students planning to be examined in American Politics are expected to master recommended readings on their own and should review additional readings included in versions of this seminar offered in the past years.

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN AMERICAN POLITICS

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
291
CCN
19555
Times
W 12-1:30pm
Location
MOSES119
Course Description

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress by graduate students. To receive two units of credit, a student must make at least one presentation of work in progress and serve as a discussant for another student's presentation. To receive one unit of credit a student must regularly attend class and participate in discussion, but will not be required to make a presentation. Appropriate works in progress include (but are not limited to) a paper in preparation for submission to a journal, a dissertation prospectus (including early drafts), a dissertation chapter, or a job market paper. Anyone working on American politics, political behavior, public law, or public administration is welcome.

Junior Seminar: Israel: Society and Politics

Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Section
1
Number
191
CCN
17243
Times
Wed 12-2pm
Location
HAVI214
Course Description
Interested students should submit a 300-word proposal for a research topic related to Israel's society or politics that they would like to investigate over the course of the semester.  The proposal should not include sources or references.  It should list a clear puzzle and one or more hypotheses.  Please send the proposal, and only the proposal, via email to Prof. Hassner at hassner@berkeley.edu no later than April 26th.  Please use "Israel Research Proposal" as the subject of your email.  Decisions will be made before the end of Phase 1.
Prerequisites

Prerequisite: PS 124A/B

Graduate Student Instructor Training Seminar

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
2
Section
1
Number
375
CCN
23090
Times
Mon 4-6pm
Location
DWIN247
Course Description

PS 375 is a two-credit course designed for first-time Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs).  The course seeks to introduce students to practical teaching methods and to foster discussion about effective pedagogy. It also focuses on professional development, in particular on developing skills that are closely related to effective teaching such as presentation skills. The course features student presentations on selected pedagogical topics, panels on key issues related to teaching and to professional development, and discussion of weekly assignments in relation to challenges encountered by GSIs in the course of their teaching.

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN THEORY

Level
Semester
Fall 2021
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
291T
CCN
26045
Times
Mon 2-4pm
Location
EVAN45
Course Description

This course is a  seminar which can be taken for 0 - 2 units, Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory with the following course description:

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress by graduate students. To receive credit for the course, the student will participate fully, including, as asked, either making a presentation of work in progress or serving as lead  discussant for another student's work. Appropriate works-in-progress include  (but are not limited to) a paper in preparation for submission to a journal, a dissertation prospectus (including early drafts), a dissertation chapter, or a job market paper. Anyone working on theory is welcome.