Search
Search

Spring 2021

semester status
Active
Semester dates
-

Emerging Research in International Relations and Comparative Politics - IR/CP Workshop

Level
Semester
Section
1
Number
290IC
CCN
33074
Times
Tuesday 1-2pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

The main aims of this workshop are met through a forum in which faculty and graduate students at various career stages work closely together. It is an applied workshop with an emphasis on learning by doing and on learning how to be a more constructive colleague. Rather than segregate PhD students by cohort, the workshop is designed to bring cohorts together in order to facilitate the student-to-student transfer of skills and knowledge.

Special Topics in Political Theory: Machiavelli's Discourses

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Section
2
Number
211
CCN
33419
Times
Th 11am-2pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

In this focused reading course, we will work through the whole of Niccolò Machiavelli's Discourses (the Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio).  Among the many topics we are likely to discuss: political foundings and refoundings; elite and popular regimes; the nature of a republic; political anthropology; corruption; the political effects of Roman religion and of Christianity; the respective roles of liberty, glory, power, reputation, virtue, fortune, and prudence; historical method and the use of exempla; and the nature of the authority of the classics in the Renaissance.  Machiavelli expected his readers to be familiar with Livy, as well as such classical authors as Polybius, Cicero, and Plutarch, and we will read selections along with the discourses for which they are most pertinent.  We will also read a small number of other sources, including Francesco Guicciardini's Considerations on the Discourses.  Students will be expected to have read Machiavelli's The Prince before the course begins.

Selected Topics in IR: Post-Conflict Politics and Policing in Comparative Perspective

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Section
1
Number
223
CCN
33342
Times
M 4-6pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description
This graduate seminar focuses on fragile states, especially post-conflict states, to consider politics in these contexts. We will examine how the design of state security institutions change and can then contribute to peacebuilding in post-conflict environments. Post-conflict orders are especially prone to failure. But we will also think beyond these states that have had civil conflict. Indeed, most civil conflicts recur shortly after they end. There is a special focus on policing in these contexts.
In this course, taking the comparative perspective seriously, all graduate students will develop case studies on how policing structures and controls change at pivotal moments of conflict termination and then how those changes affect outcomes such as citizen trust and cooperation. Graduate students may also work with us to code variables about post-conflict state policing, rebel demobilization, and peacekeeper patrolling into the PRIO-GRID dataset if they wish for a mixed-method approach. Much of the class will be helping students learn how to write case studies including through intensive workshopping of their work.

COMPARATIVE POLITICS COLLOQUIUM

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
2
Section
1
Number
291AS
CCN
23818
Times
Th 12:30-2:00
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This colloquium exposes graduate students and faculty to work by leading scholars of comparative politics working in diverse substantive areas. Graduate students are expected to read circulated papers of visiting speakers ahead of the colloquium and participate actively in raising questions and making comments.  They are encouraged to meet visiting speakers in their areas of interest in group or one-on-one sessions. 

NOTE: This description is from Spring 2015

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN THEORY

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
1
Section
1
Number
291T
CCN
32759
Times
M 2:30-4pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This course is a  seminar which can be taken for 0- 2 units, Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory with the following course description:

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress by graduate students. To receive credit for the course, the student will participate fully, including, as asked, either making a presentation of work in progress or serving as lead  discussant for another student's work. Appropriate works-in-progress include  (but are not limited to) a paper in preparation for submission to a journal, a dissertation prospectus (including early drafts), a dissertation chapter, or a job market paper. Anyone working on theory is welcome.

Research Workshop in Quantitative Modeling

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Section
1
Number
291F
CCN
21458
Times
F 10am-12pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in quantitativemodeling. Anyone working on quantitative modeling or empirical testing of quantitative models is welcome to attend. To receive credit for the course, a student must attend regularly, participate actively, and make at least two presentations per semester. Presentations can be of the student's own work-in-progress or of work by other scholars (including both influential/classic works or interesting current working papers).

Variable Unit Course: 1.0 to 3.0

QUANTITATIVE METHODOLOGY IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES SEMINAR

Level
Semester
Units
4
Section
1
Number
236B
CCN
32931
Times
M 11-2pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This course is intended to be a seminar in which we discuss research designs which have succeeded. Few causal inferences in the social sciences are compelling. We carefully examine successful examples to see why they work. The seminar is also a forum for students to discuss the research designs and methods needed in their own work. It should be particularly helpful for students writing their prospectus or designing a major research project. The seminar will be supplemented by lectures to cover the statistical and computational material needed to understand the readings such as matching methods, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, and Bayesian, maximum likelihood and robust estimation. Applications are drawn from a variety of elds including political science, statistics, economics, sociology, and public health.

 

This course description is from 2015.

Prerequisites

Political Science 236A/Statistics 239A (The Statistics of Causal Inference in the Social Sciences) or equivalent. Experience with R is assumed.

Berkeley Changemaker™: Topics in International Ethics

Semester
Section
1
Number
198
CCN
23807
Times
W 2-3pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

As Berkeley Changemakers, how do we apply ethics to critical policy questions? Designed for students who have had, or are currently taking, PS 124C Ethics and Justice in International Affairs, this 1 unit course allows a small group of students to select and engage deeply with a critical policy question that emerges from the course. Working in groups to develop a specific question, you'll craft solutions grounded in the ethical theories of the course while gaining a new perspective on how to lead change by engaging with the practical implications of implementation. This course also features practitioners in areas such as humanitarian intervention, international criminal justice, etc. who provide their perspectives on both the ethics and courses of action required for implementing change.
The Berkeley Changemakers' inclusive curriculum activates your passions and helps you to develop a sharper sense of who you want to be, while providing you the tools to take those next steps. Our curriculum focuses on critical thinking, communication, and collaboration complemented by an emphasis on creativity, community, and belonging.

 

To learn more, please visit:  https://changemaker.berkeley.edu/

Requirements

Student must have completed or be currently enrolled in PS124C, Ethics and Justice in International Relations.

Applied Econometrics and Public Policy for Undergraduates

Semester
Units
4
Section
1
Number
C131A
CCN
24639
Times
TuTh 3:30-5
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This course focuses on the sensible application of econometric methods to empirical problems in economics and public policy analysis. It provides background on issues that arise when analyzing non-experimental social science data and a guide for tools that are useful for empirical research. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of the types of research designs that can lead to convincing analysis and be comfortable working with large scale data sets.   This course is cross-listed with Econ C 142 and Public Policy C 142.

Note: This is an advanced methods course, and NOT a replacement for PS3.

Subfield: Quantitative Methods

Instructor: David Card

Prerequisites

ECON 140 or ECON 141 or consent of instructor.