Margaret Weir

CONTACT INFORMATION
Office:
458B Barrows Hall
Phone:
510 643-1602
Alternate #:
510 642-6323
Office Hours:
Wednesdays 4-6PM

Faculty

Research Interests: 
Metropolitan Politics
Social Policy
Comparative Welfare State
Public Policy
Political Sociology
Degrees: 
Ph.D., Political Science, University of Chicago
Personal Statement: 

Professor Weir received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 1986.  Her research and teaching fields include American political development, urban politics and policy, political sociology, and comparative studies of the welfare state. 

She has written widely on the politics of social policy and inequality in the United States and Europe.  Her publications include “Collaboration is Not Enough” (with Jane Rongerude and Chris Ansell) in Urban Affairs Review (2009), “The Long Shadow of the Past: Risk Pooling and the Political Development of Health Care Reform in the States” (with Anthony Chen) in Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (2009) and “States, Race, and the Decline of New Deal Liberalism,” Studies in American Political Development (2005).  She is the author of Politics and Jobs: The Boundaries of Employment Policy in the United States (Princeton: 1992) and (with Ira Katznelson), Schooling for All:  Class, Race and the Decline of the Democratic Ideal (Basic: 1992).  Her edited volumes include The Social Divide: Political Parties and the Future of Activist Government (Brookings Institution and Russell Sage Foundation Press, 1998) and (with Ann Shola Orloff and Theda Skocpol), The Politics of Social Policy in the United States (Princeton: 1988). 

Weir is currently working on a study of metropolitan inequalities and city-suburban politics in the United States.  She is director of the MacArthur Network on Building Resilient Regions, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the coauthor of a textbook on American government, We the People (New York: W.W. Norton: 2009).   Prior to coming to Berkeley, Weir taught in the Harvard Government Department and served as Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC.