Henry Brady

CONTACT INFORMATION
Office:
104 GSPP
Phone:
510 642-5116
Alternate #:
510 642-6323
Office Hours: Contact Megan Landin, Goldman School of Public Policy to request an appointment. 510.642.5116/gsppdean@berkeley.edu
Henry Brady's picture

Faculty

Research Interests: 
Electoral Politics & Political Participation
Management Information Systems
Program Evaluation
Social Welfare Policy
Degrees: 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Personal Statement: 

Henry E. Brady is Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy and Class of 1941 Monroe Deutsch Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley.  He received his PhD in Economics and Political Science from MIT in 1980.  He has written on electoral politics and political participation, social welfare policy, political polling, and statistical methodology, and he has worked for the federal Office of Management and Budget and other organizations in Washington, D.C. He is president of the American Political Science Association, past president of the Political Methodology Society of the American Political Science Association, and director of the University of California's Survey Research Center from 1998 to 2009. He is coauthor of Letting the People Decide: Dynamics of a Canadian Election (1992) which won the Harold Innis Award for the best book in the social sciences published in English in Canada, Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics (1995) which won the Philip Converse Award for a book making a lasting contribution to public opinion research, Expensive Children in Poor Families: The Intersection of Childhood Disability and Welfare (2000), and Counting All the Votes: The Performance of Voting Technology in the United States (2001). He is co-editor of Rethinking Social Inquiry (2004) which won the Sartori Award for best book on qualitative methods, Capturing Campaign Effects (2006), and the Handbook of Political Methodology (2008). Brady has also authored numerous articles on political participation, political methodology, the dynamics of public opinion, and other topics.  He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 2003 and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2006.