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Fall 2011

Institutions, Interest Groups and Public Policy

Level
Semester
Fall 2011
Number
232H
CCN
72100
Course Description

Surveys recent literature on public decision-making in government institutions, emphasizing a systematic framework for evaluating questions of public policy formation. Explores the new institutionalism in political science, applies the methods of rational choice theory to political problems, and links relevant theoretical and empirical literatures in economics and political science. Considers implications of public choice for corporate strategy and business-government relations.

Requirements

This course is cross listed with Haas School of Business Ph.D  279A

American Legal System

Semester
Fall 2011
Units
4
Number
150
CCN
72869
Course Description

Three hours of lecture and discussion per week. The course focuses on legal aspects of public policy, with an emphasis on the relative capacities of, and relationships among, law-making agencies (courts, legislatures, administrative agencies, referenda processes). Students will be exposed to primary legal materials, including judicial decisions, statutes, and regulations, and skills of legal interpretation will be developed. The course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. Course examines current problems and issues in the field of public policy. Special Note: This class is a roomshare with Public Policy PP190-1 ccn# 77151

Comparative Analysis of Industrial Democracies

Level
Semester
Fall 2011
Units
4
Number
201A
CCN
72069
Course Description

The comparative study of politics in Western societies. The place of parties, political structures, interest groups and economic institutions. The relation between domestic political developments and the international system. The effect of economic development on political change. The effect of labor politics on national politics.

Due to Professor Zysman's schedule, some class meetings might be held on Fridays.

Three American Cultures:

Semester
Fall 2011
Units
4
Number
118AC
CCN
71552
Course Description

We will look at three different cultural groups and their impact on the historical and cultural development of the United States, and how that impact may have shaped public policy in America. I will utilize the theory advanced by Gabler, that cultural artifacts such as film, television, and literature both capture America's cultural character, but suggest ways in which the many subcultures that often distinguish themselves from one another in America, in fact share much in common. I will focus on three cultural groups, European settlers, Native Americans, and African slaves. I will argue that all of them share one fundamental social condition which has impacted America's cultural development;

Japanese Politics

Semester
Fall 2011
Units
4
Number
143B
CCN
71687
Course Description

This course examines the politics and policy of contemporary Japan, applying a range of theoretical perspectives to analyze both recent history and current events. After a brief historical review, we survey the core political institutions of the postwar era, examine patterns of political interaction, and investigate current debates over policy issues. We focus particularly on political change since 1993, including the new electoral system and party realignment. Specific topics include social issues, the economic crisis, political and economic reform, U.S.-Japan relations, defense and foreign policy.

 This course falls within the Comparative Politics subfield.

Graduate Student Instructor Training Seminar

Level
Semester
Fall 2011
Units
2
Number
301
CCN
72488
Location
TBA
Course Description

This course is intended for all new Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs) in the Political Science department, and is meant to be taken simultaneously with your first semester of teaching as a GSI. The course functions as a participatory workshop, meets for two hours each week, and must be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Although the course is intended for first-time GSIs, it is not a course in "how to be a GSI," but rather how to be an effective political science teacher, now and at later steps in your professional career. Workshop time will be divided among presentations by the instructor, discussion of required readings, and discussion of weekly assignments in relation to challenges encountered by GSIs in the course of their teaching.

Public Organization Theory

Level
Semester
Fall 2011
Units
4
Number
280A
CCN
72128
Course Description
This seminar provides an opportunity to read extensively in the wide
ranging, ill defined literature devoted to the study of complex
organizations with an emphasis on its use in the study of public
organization and governmental institutions. We probe the opportunities and
limits of organization and/or administrative theories in addressing a range
of issues concerning bureaucratic dynamics. We attend initially to
historically pivotal work -- Max Weber, Chester Barnard, and Herbert Simon -
then to recent formulations and analytical issues from a number of
approaches. Core concepts and central questions provide an organizing
framework for the study of public organization in a turbulent democratic
society. These readings provide a basis for advanced work in the public
organization field. The seminar is designed for doctoral students in the
social sciences and professional programs. The process includes small
reading groups, a substantial paper, and an integrative final essay. In
addition to several books, a seminar reader is required.
Check with instructor for a more details.


Prerequisites
Prerequisites: Work in organization studies, the social science concepts, or
permission of the instructor.