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Summer 2020

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American Constitutional Law

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
157A
CCN
12912
Times
MTWR 2-4pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This course is designed as an introduction to the basic features of American constitutional law. Topics to be explored include the makeup and structure of government, the relationship of each branch to its peers and to the states, and the power granted to, and limits placed upon, the federal government by the Constitution. In the second half of the course, we will shift to explore the Fourteenth Amendment’s guarantees of equal protection and due process, including questions regarding race, sex, and sexual orientation discrimination.

 

 

Instructor: David Schraub

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN POLITICS

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Units
4
Section
1
Number
1
CCN
12768
Times
MTWT 4-6
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This course provides an overview of the U.S. political system from the nation's founding to the present. In addition to examining the core structures of our federal system, we will also explore a number of special topics, such as the evolution of civil rights and the causes of partisan gridlock. The course will pay particular attention to the role institutions play in shaping political conflict and, ultimately,in determining who wins and who loses.

Instructor: Thomas Kent

 

 

 

The Politics of European Integration

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Units
4
Section
1
Number
122A
CCN
13104
Times
MTWR 10-12
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

For more than sixty years, the European Union has represented the world’s most advanced experiment in governance beyond the nation-state. More recently, however, this experiment has become mired in financial turbulence and growing social protest, and for the first time faces the withdrawal of a member. This course takes a broad view of the promise as well as the challenges of European integration. It looks at the EU’s institutional components, the events leading to the single currency in the 1990s, enlargement eastward into the post-socialist world, and the major crises that have been challenging Europe since 2008: the financial crisis, the rise of populism, and Brexit. These topics allow us to assess Europe’s ability to craft adequate responses to the challenges posed by economic transformation, terrorism, multiculturalism, and worldwide financial interdependence, and to come to a better understanding of the EU’s current and future role on the world stage.

Instructor: Matthew Stenberg

 

 

Psychology of Politics

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Units
4
Section
1
Number
N164A
CCN
12760
Times
MTWT 4-6
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a basic framework for understanding howpsychological processes impact citizens’ political decision-making, attitudes, behaviors, and identities.
Over six weeks, we will look at theories and evidence from social, cognitive, behavioral, anddevelopmental psychology, which will we then apply to modern and historical political conflicts and
dilemmas. Throughout the course, we will also consider how well psychology explains various political phenomena, relative to approaches from economics and other fields.

Instructor: Sean Freeder

TOPICS IN AREA STUDIES: DICTATORSHIP AND ITS DISCONTENTS

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
149W
CCN
12410
Times
MTW 1-4pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

The overwhelming majority of governments throughout history have been dictatorial. Even the recent spread of democracy has not extirpated authoritarian rule: as of 2012 roughly one quarter of all countries are considered full-blown autocracies. Whatever the benefits of democracy, it seems dictatorship is here to stay. This course explores the characteristics and dynamics of non-democratic regimes: how and why they come about, what sustains them, why some people resist them and others do not, and how and why they decline and fall. We will explore a variety of examples from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. Using films and novels in addition to political science literature, we will investigate how dictators maintain their power, how ordinary people react to repression, and the links between dictatorship and security and economic development.

Subfield: Comparative Politics

 

Note: Course description is from Summer 2014

Selected Topics in Comparative Politics: Women in Politics in Comparative Perspective

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Units
4
Section
1
Number
140M
CCN
15332
Times
MTWR 10-12
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

Women make up around 49.5% of the global population, yet they are strikingly underrepresented when it comes to political office. Looking at the global average, women only hold 24% of seats at the parliamentary level. The percent of women in office varies drastically between countries. For example, quota-based countries like Rwanda have 60% women in parliament, whereas countries with unique electoral systems like Lebanon only have 4.7%. This course looks to explain this variation, and further understand the consequences of it. We will focus on questions such as: How do electoral systems affect women’s access to elected office?  What, if any, are the negative effects of imposing gender quotas? If elected, do women promote greater substantive representation? We will look into the potential for gender-based discrimination among socialized gender roles, voters, political parties, campaign policies, and the media. Please be advised that this is not a course on feminist theory, but rather an investigation of the barriers to women’s representation and political participation.

Instructor: Melanie Phillips

Introduction to Empirical Analysis and Quantitative Methods

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
W3
CCN
13052
Times
ONLINE
Location
ONLINE
Course Description

This course provides an overview of some of the methods employed in political science research. Its purpose is to familiarize you with the scientific study of politics, and to teach you how to pose and answer empirical research questions using appropriate evidence and arguments. Along the way we will learn about how to formulate and evaluate theories, how to design research to discover whether a particular theory holds up empirically, and some basic research strategies. By the end of the course you should have the tools to critically evaluate the kinds of social science arguments found in everyday life and be able to conduct your own independent research.

 

Course runs during Session C (June 22- August 14)

UNDERSTANDING POLITICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN INDIA

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
W145A
CCN
12408
Times
Online Course
Location
Online Course
Course Description

This class, which focuses mostly on the domestic politics of India, has multiple aims.   In addition to providing an overview of political developments in India since independence, this online course assesses the nature of democratic participation and representation in contemporary India-the world's largest democracy. Course is scheduled to run  Session C (June 22 - August 14).

 

Please note you will NOT be able to take Political Science W145A, if you are enrolled or have completed Political Science 145A. This is an on-line variation of the course.

 

Note: Course description is from Summer 2013

Game Theory in the Social Sciences (Online Course)

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
W135
CCN
12406
Times
Online Course
Location
Online Course
Course Description

Political science deals with the behavior of individuals in settings of collective or group choice. The best course of action for any individual to take in such settings generally depends on the course of action taken by others with whom they interact. For instance, the best strategy by a candidate in an election campaign might depend on the strategy adopted by other candidates. The best approach for achieving gains in a peace settlement for one nation-state depends on how other nation-states will
react. Game theory is the analysis of decision making in situations where one individual's best action depends on the actions taken by other individuals. This course provides a relatively non-technical introduction to game theory and its application in social science, especially political science and also economics.

Course runs during Session C (June 22- August 14)

Please note you will NOT be able to take Political Science W135, if you are enrolled or have completed Political Science C135/ECON C110. This is an on-line variation of the course.

In addition, PS W135 is an advanced METHODS course. The course can NOT be used as a substitute for PS 3.  It also does NOT count towards the Political Theory distribution requirement.

Note: This description is from Summer 2015

Special Topics in Political Theory: Sovereignty

Level
Semester
Summer 2020
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
1
Number
116O
CCN
15398
Times
MTWR 12-2pm
Location
REMOTE
Course Description

This course aims to study sovereignty, widely regarded the core concept constitutive of modern state-centric politics and international law.  The first part of the course will study the origins of the concept in medieval legal and political thought and its later development in major texts by Bodin, Grotius, Hobbes, Pufendorf, Rousseau, Schmitt, Arendt.  The second part of the course will then focus on major interpretive themes associated with the politics of sovereignty, such as territoriality, constitutionalism, and sovereignty in international law.  Readings may include studies by Agamben, Grimm, Kantorowicz, Krasner, Kalyvas, Loughlin, Skinner, Stilz, and Tierney.  This is an upper-level undergraduate Theory course.  It is highly recommended that students will have already completed EITHER PS 112a or 112b or an equivalent course in the history of political thought.  

 

**Note: Course ID changed from 116A.