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Spring 2018

semester status
Active

JUNIOR SEMINAR: TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE

Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Section
5
Number
191
CCN
42643
Times
Tu 10a-12p
Location
202 Barrows
Course Description

This interdisciplinary course explores the different approaches taken by individual countries and the international community to violations of international human rights. It focuses in particular on the challenges raised by the demand for accountability during periods of political transition, as countries move from authoritarian regimes and civil wars to societies based on democracy and the rule of law. It examines current principles of accountability as well as the various mechanisms for enforcing these principles, including truth and reconciliation commissions, international criminal tribunals, legal actions by third-party countries under the theory of universal jurisdiction, “lustration” laws that bar perpetrators of human rights abuses from holding public office, and reparations for victims of human rights violations. The course also considers the obstacles to achieving accountability for international human rights violations, including domestic political instability, national amnesty laws, institutional weaknesses, and geopolitical concerns.

Students who have taken Professor Silverberg's junior seminar "Accountability for International Human Rights Violations" in the past (last offered Fall 2012) cannot take this seminar as it has the same content with just a different title.

Requirements

The Junior Seminars are intense writing seminars which focus on the research area of the faculty member teaching the course. The seminars provide an opportunity for students to have direct intellectual interactions with faculty members while also giving the students an understanding for faculty research. Junior seminars fulfill upper division requirements for the major.

Prerequisites

Students must be declared Political Science majors in their junior or senior year (based on year, NOT units) to qualify. 

 

COMPARATIVE POLITICS COLLOQUIUM

Level
Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
2
Number
291AS
CCN
29244
Times
Th 12:30-2:00
Location
223 Moses
Course Description

This colloquium exposes graduate students and faculty to work by leading scholars of comparative politics working in diverse substantive areas. Graduate students are expected to read circulated papers of visiting speakers ahead of the colloquium and participate actively in raising questions and making comments.  They are encouraged to meet visiting speakers in their areas of interest in group or one-on-one sessions. 

NOTE: This description is from Spring 2015

JUNIOR SEMINAR: The Politician

Semester
Units
4
Section
4
Number
191
CCN
42155
Times
Tu 2-4
Course Description
This seminar will explore whether there are intelligible aspects of political practice by elected or appointed individuals that can be comprehended and studied rigorously. The kinds of questions that will guide this inquiry include: Is political ambition different from other kinds of ambition? Is there something distinctive about the allure of political power?  Are there different educational traits or requirements for people who enter political life? Are there discernable differences between executive officials (mayors, governors, presidents, cabinet members, etc.) and legislators? What is the connection between public rhetoric, political ideas, and practice? Is it possible to develop consistent frameworks for assessing political leadership? How do the rewards of political life differ from the rewards of commercial activity or other professions, and does this affect the ethical values by which we judge political actions? 
 
Note: This is an additional section of "The Politician" Junior Seminar.
 
Instructor: Steven Hayward
 
Subfield: American Politics
Requirements

The Junior Seminars are intense writing seminars which focus on the research area of the faculty member teaching the course.   The seminars provide an opportunity for students to have direct intellectual interactions with faculty members while also giving the students an understanding for faculty research.

This junior seminar falls within the "American Politics" subfield, and can fulfill an upper-division requirement for the major.

Prerequisites

Political Science Majors of Junior and Senior status (must be 3rd or 4th year students with at least 60 units completed). Priority may be given to students who have not yet taken a junior seminar. 

SELECTED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS

Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Number
123S
CCN
39372
Times
TuTh 2−330P
Location
170 Barrows
Course Description

Are human rights women's rights? Are women's rights human rights? This course examines the international human rights system (treaties, conventions, institutions and case law) through the lens of gender, exploring the ways in which they are organized around gendered assumptions that shape and limit their ability to reach and remedy the reality of women's lives. The course also considers the tension between international human rights law and local gender justice as well as how international human rights have evolved in response to the rise of global feminisms. The course explores these issues through a series of case studies examining such issues as sexual violence, human trafficking, religious freedom and women's access to education, health care and employment.

Subfield: International Relations

 

Note: This description is from Fall 2013

SELECTED TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: Small Wars and Insurgency

Semester
Instructor(s)
Units
4
Number
123J
CCN
41925
Times
TuTh 3:30-5
Location
160 Kroeber
Course Description

This course explores the characteristics, causes, and consequences of insurgency wars. Irregular warfare between insurgent and state forces has been the dominant form of armed conflict since the end of World War II. Yet, international relations scholars paid little attention to these “small wars” before U.S.-led operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. This course provides an overview of the history behind insurgency wars and debates the primary theories that try to explain guerrilla and counterinsurgent behavior. We will explore the underlying political, social, economic, and cultural factors that lead to rebellion, the competing strategic approaches to conducting insurgency and counterinsurgency, the immediate and long-term consequences of this type of political violence, and policy options for intervention prior and during small wars. Our empirical focus will be on conflicts in the 19th and 20th centuries, with particular attention to the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia. 

 

Instructor: Jason Klocek

Political Theory Workshop

Level
Semester
Units
4
Number
211
CCN
29232
Times
F 12-3:00
Location
141 Boalt
Course Description

This course is a workshop for discussing work-in-progress in moral, political, and legal theory. The workshop creates a space for students to engage directly with philosophers, political theorists, and legal scholars working on normative questions toward the goal of fostering critical thinking about concepts of value and developing analytical thinking and writing skills. Another aim is to bring together people from different disciplines and perspectives who have strong normative interests or who speak to issues philosophers and theorists should know something about. In Spring 2018, the theme will be democracy. The list of invited speakers is below.

The format of the course is as follows. For the sessions with guest presenters, lunch will be served starting at 12:00. We’ll begin at 12:15. A designated commentator will lead off with a 15-minute comment on the paper. The presenter will have 5-10 minutes to respond and then we will open up the discussion to the group. The first part of the course will be open to non-enrolled students, faculty, and visitors who wish to participate in the workshop discussion. We’ll stop for a break at 2 and those not enrolled in the course will leave. Enrolled students will continue the discussion with the guest from 2:10 to 3:00.

For Spring 2018, Professor Niko Kolodny will be teaching with Joshua Cohen , and the theme will be democracy.

For the most up to date description and schedule, please refer to https://bcourses.berkeley.edu/courses/1467146

Note: This course follows the Law School Calendar

https://www.law.berkeley.edu/php-programs/courses/academic_calendars.php

 

COLLOQUIUM IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

Semester
Units
1
Number
179
CCN
32483
Times
W 4-5
Location
Wheeler Aud
Course Description

This one-unit course will feature a guest speaker each week discussing an issue currently in the news. The class is open to all students, and there are no prerequisites. The class is offered Pass/Not Pass, based on a final examination. May be repeated for credit.

This course does not count as an upper division Political Science requirement.

Requirements

The Apperson Product Form # 2833 which will be used for the final examination will be available for purchase at ASUC bookstore.

Selected Topics in Area Studies: The Arab-Palestinian Society in Israel: Trends of Integration vs. Segregation

Semester
Number
149R
CCN
41425
Times
M 2:00-5:00
Location
166 Barrows
Course Description
The course focuses on the Arab-Palestinian citizens of Israel, living within the Green-Line. This course aims to outline a comprehensive, updated, and detailed situation of the Arab-Palestinian society and their contemporary trends to integrate in vs. to separate from the Israeli society in each one of the themes explored: categorization; societal structure; politics and public sphere; discrimination / racism; education and social activity; economy; services. The course begins with an introduction to the Israeli society and politics, including contemporary changes. Thus, the course will be divided to four sections: History of the Arab society in Israel; Societal changes; Politics- national and local; Arabs and Jews in Israel.

Instructor:  Rami Zeedan