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Fall 2009

semester status
Disabled

Campaign Strategy - Media and Message

Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
106A
CCN
71619
Course Description

An inside look at how political campaigns operate from the people who run them. Class material will be directed toward students who are interested in direct involvement in campaign politics or who are looking for a greater understanding of the political process. Students will be required to develop a complete written campaign strategy document in order to fulfill class requirements. Students will be expected to follow political and campaign news through the news media and be prepared to discuss those developments in class. Serious lectures, discussion and classroom exercises on campaign strategy and message development and delivery, with a special focus the role of political media. This section will focus predominantly on campaign advertising, news media coverage, the emerging role of the Internet, and other means by which candidates communicate their message to the voters.

Subfield: American Politics

Prerequisites

Students must have completed PS 1. Priority will be given to juniors and seniors.

Introduction to Empirical Analysis and Quantitative Methods

Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
3
CCN
71493
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the methods employed in empirical political science research. We will cover basic topics in research design, statistics, and formal modeling, considering many examples along the way. The two primary goals of the course are: (1) to provide students with analytic tools that will help them to understand how political scientists do empirical research, and (2) to improve students' ability to pose and answer research questions on their own. There are no prerequisites.

Topics in American Politics: Roles of Polls and Public Opinion

Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
109A
CCN
71631
Course Description

This course endeavors to explore the myriad uses of public opinion in leadership and decision-making. We will examine what public opinion research is, how it is conducted, and how it is used in a wide range of contexts, both public and private. We will reference actual case studies involving public opinion in political campaigns, constituency organizing, crisis management, and a variety of other contexts to provide an inside view of how opinion research is actually conducted and used. Specific questions will be addressed, such as: How does an incumbent politician formulate strategy and successfully communicate messages in the midst of a dirty politics/decidedly anti-incumbent senatorial campaign? What would you do if you were governor and your roads and highways needed improvements, but the public opposed a new gas tax? If you were a CEO of a large company and you had safety concerns about some of your products, how would you balance your corporate image and reputation against the independence from government influence? As a news organization interested in probing public concern on a variety of current social and political events, how do you decide what questions to ask, and how do you translate these results into news?

This course falls within the American Politics subfield.

Introduction to Comparative Politics

Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
2
CCN
71448
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to comparative politics. It aims to furnish students with the tools necessary to study politics and society in comparative perspective. The course is divided into five parts. The first introduces basic concepts and methods of comparative analysis and examines some of the core assumptions about human nature that underpin social scientists’ thinking. The second surveys the variety of political regimes under which people live. The third portion of the course examines the factors that influence which type of political regime prevails in particular national settings. The fourth section focuses on economic development. The fifth investigates problems of peace and conflict.

 

No laptop computers are allowed in class.

Introduction To American Politics

Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
1
CCN
71403
Course Description

This class is an introduction to the American political system. The course is designed to make you think about the logic of our government's institutions, and the consequences - both intended and unintended - of these institutions for the political behavior of citizens, legislators, and other political leaders and activists. Topics to be covered include the Constitution, American political culture, civil rights, the presidency, Congress, Supreme Court, political parties, elections, public opinion, and interest groups.

 

Introduction to Political Theory

Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
4
CCN
71538
Course Description

Is political freedom about doing what you want, sharing power, or actively participating in political life? Is freedom an inherently individual practice or a necessarily collective one? A personal or public matter? What secures freedom and what erodes it? What is the relationship of political freedom to power, equality, community and identity? What if humans don’t want to be free?

In this course, we will pursue these questions in the context of reading classics in Western political theory as well as more contemporary writings. We will also consider selected political problems and debates, e.g., do hate speech laws protect or infringe freedom? what kind of freedom does neoliberal globalization promote?

Comparative Political Economy

Level
Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Number
209A
CCN
72092
Course Description

This course provides a broad survey of some of the major debates in comparative political economy today, focusing especially on the creation, evolution and reform of market institutions. We begin by reading some of the classic works in political economy, including those of Smith, Marx, Polanyi, and Gerschenkron, and reviewing more recent work from institutional economics, economic sociology, and political science. We then proceed with a selective survey of literature on the political economy of Western Europe, Japan, the East Asian and Latin American NIEs, the developing countries, and the post-Communist economies.

Metropolitan Governance in Developing Countries

Level
Semester
Fall 2009
Units
4
Section
1
Number
203
CCN
72090
Times
Th 3-5P
Location
791 BARROWS
Course Description

This course will be cross-listed with:

Global Metropolitan Studies (GMS) metrostudies.berkeley.edu/

Metropolitan areas in the developing world face enormous challenges. This course will consider the political and institutional environment in which efforts to address metropolitan problems are developed, the financial and institutional vehicles used to provide services of different types, and the role of political parties and other forms of political organization in the development and allocation of services. Emphasis will be placed upon fertile areas for research within the social sciences. Topics will include metropolitan institutions and political regime types, decentralization and multi-level governance, the rule of law and urban violence, civil society and popular mobilization, political party organization and mobilization strategies, public policy formulation, urban bureaucracies, corruption, the politics of urbanization, and the metropolitan political economy. Readings will be drawn primarily from Political Science, Sociology, Geography, and Economics.